Case studies

Back to all Case Studies

Tags

Share Download PDF

Clinician

Mr. Michael Eames, Consultant Orthopedic Surgeon

Healthcare Provider

Ulster Hospital, Northern Ireland

Stack images

732 CT images

Process and delivery

48 hours

Abstract

A patient specific physical 3D printed model provided better insight into the pathology leading to a drastic reduction in theatre time and optimum result for the patient.

Colour

White

Contrast

None

Joined/Seperated

Separated

Solid/Hollow

Solid

Challenge/Case

A young male patient was admitted to the Ulster Hospital with problems in supination and pronation of the forearm. Due to the amorphous arrangement and the complex 3D rotation of the bones, a comprehensive understanding of the extent of the patient’s deformity was difficult to conceptualise using CT scans alone.

Solution

The surgeon was provided with a 1:1 scale physical 3D printed model of the complex deformity of both the radius and ulna. The bones were separately printed to allow articulating movement to be mimicked as if the bones were in situ.

FIG 1: Proximal articular surface of the radius showing 3D rotation.
FIG 2: Distal aspect of ulna.
FIG 3: High resolution SLA models of full radius and ulna showing 3D rotation.
FIG 4: Surgeon rotating arm to mimic articular movement in forearm to assess the loss of space.
FIG 5: 3D interactive visualistion used to explain procedure to patient and parents.

Having a tangible scale piece of anatomy provides huge insight into the pathology not possible on conventional CT or MRI scans. Access to the model changed the standard treatment indicated by the CT scans for a 4 hour complex osteotomy to a simple, much less invasive 30 minute soft tissue procedure.


Mr. Michael Eames, Consultant Orthopedic Surgeon, Ulster Hospital, Northern Ireland
Mr. Michael Eames, Consultant Orthopedic Surgeon, Ulster Hospital, Northern Ireland

Result

The physical 3D model offered a much better view and understanding of the 3D rotation of the forearm anatomy which allowed for accurate diagnosis of the patient’s pathology. With the physical model, it was discovered that the loss of space was not, as originally thought, due to the bones deformity but rather the soft tissues that had scared down the interosseous membrane. The course of treatment was updated accordingly.

Conclusion

Using the physical 3D printed models to assess the patient’s anatomy outside the body in full scale enabled the surgeon to assess the 3D rotation, improve the diagnosis and determine a more appropriate treatment for the patient. The surgery time was reduced by over three hours, decreasing the time the patient spent under anesthesia, in post-operative care and his ensuing rehabilitation.

Elevating Patient Care

  • Faster treatment
  • Reduced time in theatre with less invasive surgery
  • Rapid recovery
  • Reduced complications

Advancing Surgical Standards

  • Greater insight led to improved diagnosis
  • More accurate treatment
  • Clearer communications with patient and medical team

Improving Standards and Efficiencies

  • Increased standards of care
  • Reduced risk of complications and infections
  • Saved time and money in surgery and post-operative care
Share Download PDF

Clinician

Mr. Michael Eames, Consultant Orthopedic Surgeon

Healthcare Provider

Ulster Hospital, Northern Ireland

Stack images

732 CT images

Process and delivery

48 hours

Tags

[...] Access to the model changed the standard treatment indicated by the CT scans for a 4hour complex osteotomy to a simple, much less invasive 30 minute soft tissue procedure.